BICYCLE SAFETY RULES FOR KIDS. SCOTT TRIATHLON BIKE

ROAD BIKE HANDLEBAR WRAP - ROAD BIKE


ROAD BIKE HANDLEBAR WRAP - CLARK KENT BIKES.



Road Bike Handlebar Wrap





road bike handlebar wrap







    road
  • a way or means to achieve something; "the road to fame"

  • A regular trade route for a particular commodity

  • A wide way leading from one place to another, esp. one with a specially prepared surface that vehicles can use

  • (roads) a partly sheltered anchorage

  • The part of such a way intended for vehicles, esp. in contrast to a shoulder or sidewalk

  • an open way (generally public) for travel or transportation





    wrap
  • arrange or fold as a cover or protection; "wrap the baby before taking her out"; "Wrap the present"

  • wind: arrange or or coil around; "roll your hair around your finger"; "Twine the thread around the spool"; "She wrapped her arms around the child"

  • A loose outer garment or piece of material

  • Paper or soft material used for wrapping

  • Denoting a garment having one part overlapping another; wraparound

  • cloak that is folded or wrapped around a person











Motobecane Grand Record minor changes




Motobecane Grand Record   minor changes





This is not a very flattering angle but I wanted to take a quick photo showing some modifications I made to the components on this bike... last night (gotta embrace insomnia).

First, I decided to change the handlebar tape on this bike from frayed and faded black cloth tape to the perforated red microtex microfiber bar tape from Fi'zi:k now seen here. No small change is ever so simple (not for me), so this one little task only got me started and hours later I had made a multitude of additional "minor" changes to the setup on this bike. Fortunatley, everything seems to have worked out very nicely.

I had decided that If I was changing the bar wrap, I would also change the brake levers. The previous Mafac levers had a longer reach than was comfortable for my small hands and short fingers. These are old Weinmann levers from the late 1970s or early 1980s. One advantage of this simple model is the body shape allows many inexpensive and readily available Dia-Compe hoods to be used.

Weinmann centerpull brake calipers (#610 + #610) would have been original on this bike. So, with the Weinmann levers, I decided to also re-fit the bike with Weinmann calipers, too... Unfortunately, I forgot I currently have no spares - Oops!

But, I did have pair of unused Tektro 521AG calipers just sitting on the shelf. These are modern dual-pivot calipers with a very nice shiny finish. These have a fairly long reach - formerly considered a "standard" length - of 47-59 mm. However, after removing all of the center-pull hanger hardware, I discovered the rear caliper was too short for the rather high brake bridge of this bike. Alas, not a problem... I simply mounted the rear brake on the front side of the seat stays... and now the pads reach the rims easily.

Because the brake hanger hardware for the center-pull calipers was no longer necessary, and I had removed the front bracket from the headset, I also changed the seatpost binder bolt from the Specialites TA model... which was an integrated cable hanger + binder bolt. It is now a simple Campagnolo-style bolt from Sugino. This one has a keyway tab to fit the notch in one side of the Nervex binder "ears" - rather the knurled cone on one side of a Campagnolo seat bolt.

I also decided to change the cable routing of the bar-end shifters. The derailleur cables had been routed through the handlebars (which I had drilled out). Now the cables exit right at the ends of the mounting pods. I was pleased to quickly notice that without the additional acute angles which I had previously imposed on the cable housings, the derailleurs now respond to shifts much more rapidly.

I also have now changed back to more normal Right/Rear & Left/Front routing for both brakes and shifters. Of course, with different brake and shift lever cable length requirements, I've now changed all of the cable housings and inner wires, too.

Because I decided that I really do not ride this bike in either rainy weather or on dirty dusty unpaved roads, I have now removed the black plastic mudguards which I had mounted.

Yes... {sigh}... just make one small change, and... :-)











IMG 5608




IMG 5608





Starbuck, my brevet and lightweight-touring bike, in her current configuration.

Frameset: Rivendell Rambouillet, 56cm
Headset: Shimano Ultegra 1" Threaded
Front Wheel: SON28 Dyno hub, Mavic Open Sport, 32h 3x
Rear Wheel: White Industries Ti Tracker, Mavic MA3, 32h 3x
Skewers: Salsa Flip-off
Tires: Grand Bois Cypres, 700c x 28mm
Front Derailleur: Shimano 600 FD-6207
Rear Derailleur: Shimano Dura Ace FD-7800 SS
Shifters: Shimano Dura Ace 9-Speed Barends
Chain: SRAM PC-970
Cassette: Shimano Ultegra 12-27
Crankset: TA Pro Vis 5, 46/26, 175mm
Bottom Bracket: Shimano Dura Ace cup and cone, 117.5mm
Pedals: Crank Brothers Quattro Ti
Brakes: Velo-Orange Grand Cru Calipers
Brake Levers: Cane Creek SCR-5
Handlebar: Nitto Noodle, 44cm
Stem: Nitto Pearl, 10cm
Tape: Brooks leather
Seat post: Nitto Crystal Fellows 626
Saddle: Brooks Pro
Fenders: Gilles Berthoud, 40mm
Front Rack: Nitto M18
Rear Rack: Tubus Luna
Bottle Cages: Velo-Orange Retro
Lights: Schmidt Edelux, Spanninga SPXb, Planet Bike Superflash
Bell: Velo-Orange, brass, spacer mounted
Cyclocomputer: Sigma 1606 L
Pump: Topeak Road Masterblaster 5459

Almost exactly how I want it now. The next swap would be a dynamo-powered fender light, either the Spanninga or B&M 4-D. I'll probably change the rear derailleur to a medium cage, though I'm in no rush for that as things work as is. I'm curious as to whether Grand Bois 30mm tires would fit; the fender clearance in the rear is tight as is. I also need to put in some slick teflon derailleur cables. I run my shifter cable housing under my handlebar wrap rather than have them come out the front. Shifts fine, but not as crisply as they could. The thing is I need to find one of the extra-long tandem length ones.

With the addition of the dynamo hub in the front, my old White Industries front wheel is now loose. If I find a killer deal on a 135mm spaced White Industries or Phil Wood hub, I might put that on the Riv to free up the current rear wheel. Then I'd have a matched set again that could go on another bike, like my RB-2, or stick it on Bronwyn's bike in anticipation of the two-month tour this fall, which would be a more appropriate wheel choice than the Mavic Cosmos that are on her bike now.

Nitpicky things:
The Tubus rack is great, but I may eventually change the rear rack to a Nitto Campee, R14, or swap the R15 that is currently on Bronwyn's bike to match the finish of the front rack and the rest of the bike's shiny bits, but that is super-low priority. One nitpicky thing would be to get the Superflash Stealth model because that white is killing me for aesthetics. I might also paint the pump to match.









road bike handlebar wrap







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